Ripe Good Scholar
Venus, Adonis, and Ovid

Venus, Adonis, and Ovid

September 28, 2021

This is episode 38 of Ripe Good Scholar: Venus, Adonis, and Ovid

Hello and welcome to Ripe Good Scholar. During his school days Shakespeare was studying the Latin classics, including one that would be a favorite in his life as a playwright, Ovid. Shakespeare adapted a story from Ovid into his best-selling poem, Venus and Adonis. While we are very familiar with Shakespeare adapting other works, readers may be surprised to notice such a stark difference between the two tellings. That is why today Eli and I will be examining the story in both Ovid and Shakespeare to find the differences and identify a few surprising similarities.

For this episode I read Charles Martin’s translation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses, along with Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis and several other articles. If you want to check out those and so much more, head over to ripegoodscholar.com/ep38.

Teller of Tales by Kevin MacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4467-teller-of-the-tales

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 

Minstrel Guild by KevinMacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4056-minstrel-guild

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

A Groatsworth of Wit

A Groatsworth of Wit

September 21, 2021

Hello and welcome to Ripe Good Scholar. One of the first written references to Shakespeare in the London Theater scene is a pamphlet written by Robert Greene on his deathbed, A Groatsworth of Wit. In it, he warns his fellow playwrights to beware of this “upstart crow” who was coming in to steal their glory. These Shakespeare references are why the pamphlet is so well known today, but there is so much more to it than that. There is a story, a peek into the inner world of Elizabethan theater and some insults so damning that the editor had to issue an apology. It’s a compelling pamphlet for all those reasons and more which is why we will be exploring it today.

For this episode I read A Groatsworth of Wit, modernized by Nina Green, along with several other articles. If you want to check out those and so much more, head over to ripegoodscholar.com/ep37.

 

Teller of Tales by Kevin MacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4467-teller-of-the-tales

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 

Minstrel Guild by KevinMacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4056-minstrel-guild

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Shakespeare in Colonial America

Shakespeare in Colonial America

September 6, 2021

Hello and welcome to Ripe Good Scholar. William Shakespeare is not just a staple of British culture. His works are an important staple of American culture as well. This evolution was not a simple one or one that was straight forward. There were obstacles to overcome and despite the questionable odds, Shakespeare became ingrained in American culture. Today we are going to look at the early days of the american colonies and when Shakespeare made the journey across the Atlantic. It’s an interesting look into the history of America and the role Shakespeare played in the early days of our country.

For this episode I read Shakespeare and the Making of America by Kevin J. Hayes. If you want to check out that book and so much more, head over to ripegoodscholar.com/ep36.

 

Teller of Tales by Kevin MacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4467-teller-of-the-tales

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 

Minstrel Guild by KevinMacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4056-minstrel-guild

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Leontes’ Paranoia

Leontes’ Paranoia

August 23, 2021

In this episode…

Dr. Lisa Grogan and I will take a look at Leontes’ from The Winter’s Tale. Early in the play, he becomes obsessed with the idea that his wife is having an affair with his friend, the King of Bohemia. His paranoia escalates quickly and, once he suffers any consequences, subsides just as quickly. This, to me, seemed unrealistic, so I spoke with Dr. Grogan about it. Her insights were interesting because the pattern was realistic, just sped up, which is pretty on par with Shakespeare.

In addition to examining Leontes in particular, we discuss paranoid delusions in general, what it looks like, and how to combat it. While this episode can provide some interesting insight into the character of Leontes and the inner workings of his mind, it is not medical advice that should be applied outside of fictional characters. If you suspect you or someone in your life is suffering from paranoid delusions, please seek the help of a medical professional.

For the full show notes, go to ripegoodscholar.com/ep25

Teller of Tales by Kevin MacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4467-teller-of-the-tales

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 

Minstrel Guild by KevinMacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4056-minstrel-guild

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

City Comedies

City Comedies

August 19, 2021

Welcome to episode 34 of Ripe Good Scholar: City Comedies.

In this episode, Eli and I will be discussing one of the most popular play genres of Shakespeare’s time, the city comedy. While the precise definition is difficult, the basic definition is a play which focuses on the day to day happenings of the middle class. Common topics were sex and money. The comedy also tended to be on the raunchier or bawdier side. It’s like if you took all of the most hilarious scenes in Shakespeare’s plays and put them into one play. Because the plays focus on everyday people and everyday occurrences (more or less) they are able to poke fun at the ridiculousness of everyday life. It’s what makes them enjoyable long after they were written.

Although the genre was popular at the time, Shakespeare only penned one: The Merry Wives of Windsor. Merry Wives relies on a few of the common tropes seen in city comedies, which is what makes it an excellent study of the subgenre. Today, Eli and I will be looking at city comedies and what makes Merry Wives an excellent one.

For this episode, I relied primarily on Citizen Comedy in the Age of Shakespeare by Alexander Leggatt.

For the full show notes go to ripegoodscholar.com/ep34

 

Teller of Tales by Kevin MacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4467-teller-of-the-tales

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 

Minstrel Guild by KevinMacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4056-minstrel-guild

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Folklore Cymbeline

Folklore Cymbeline

August 9, 2021

Welcome to episode #33 of Ripe Good Scholar the podcast where we explore the journey Shakespeare’s texts have travelled through the centuries.

 

In this episode,

Eli and I will be comparing Shakespeare’s Cymbeline to the folktale Snow White. Despite the fact that Snow White was not published until decades after Shakespeare’s death, the folktale would have been passed down through the oral tradition for many years before publication. It is these oral tales that influenced Shakespeare as he wrote his play. In fact, it looks like Shakespeare drew inspiration from a few different folktales to tell the story of Cymbeline, but today our focus is on Imogen and her similarities to Snow White.

It is worth noting that the story of Cymbeline also appears in Holinshed’s Chronicles. We have not looked at that story yet, so we will have to wait and see whether it was Shakespeare or Holinshed that took inspiration from folktales.

For the full show notes head over to ripegoodscholar.com/ep33

The Analyzing of a Shrew

The Analyzing of a Shrew

August 2, 2021

Welcome to episode 32 of Ripe Good Scholar: The Analyzing of a Shrew.

 

In this episode…

Dr. Lisa Grogan and I will take a trip through the mind of Katherine from The Taming of a Shrew. From the start of the play, Katherine is portrayed as an unpleasant and outspoken woman. These traits make her an outcast in her society. The people in her life make it clear to her that her behavior is not desirable or even very likable. It doesn’t prompt her to change though, even though it makes finding a husband difficult. She would rather be true to herself than conform, which makes her a rather admirable woman.

 

However, no one in the play seems to appreciate Katherine’s self-confidence. With all of the comments and insults flung her way, it’s no wonder Katherine behaves like a “shrew.” It begs the question: what came first the insults or the shrew?

For full show notes go to: ripegoodscholar.com/episodes/analyzing-shrew

 

Teller of Tales by Kevin MacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4467-teller-of-the-tales

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 

Minstrel Guild by KevinMacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4056-minstrel-guild

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Restoration Rewrites

Restoration Rewrites

July 26, 2021

Following the Restoration of the monarchy and therefore playhouses, Shakespeare's plays had to change with the changing expectations of theatre.

Show notes: ripegoodscholar.com/ep32

 

Teller of Tales by Kevin MacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4467-teller-of-the-tales

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 

Minstrel Guild by KevinMacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4056-minstrel-guild

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Darkness Representing Evil

Darkness Representing Evil

July 19, 2021

Welcome to episode 30 of Ripe Good Scholar: Darkness Representing Evil

 

In this episode…

We are looking at the evolution of race from the Middle Ages to Shakespeare’s time. The discussion is more complicated than we might think. This period of time was when the concept of race as we know it today was being forged. Renaissance Europe was experiencing a huge step forward in globalization. This period was the beginning of colonization and the slave trade. There was also a LOT of trade happening. This meant that what was an exotic other was suddenly very close to home. The people of Renaissance Europe had to figure out what this meant for them and how to interact with these new darker skinned people. Unfortunately, it wasn’t usually pleasant, but that is what colored Shakespeare’s writing as he introduced characters of color. That is what we are going to be exploring today.

 

For this episode, I read a selection from the Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare and Race, along with a number of articles you will find linked in the show notes.

 

Full show notes available at ripegoodscholar.com/ep30

 

Teller of Tales by Kevin MacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4467-teller-of-the-tales

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 

Minstrel Guild by KevinMacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4056-minstrel-guild

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

The Norse Origins of Hamlet

The Norse Origins of Hamlet

July 12, 2021

Welcome to episode 29 of Ripe Good Scholar: The Norse Origins of Hamlet.

 

In this episode…

We will be taking a deep dive into the texts that inspired Shakespeare’s Hamlet. It all started in the early days of Danish history and went through a few iterations before finally reaching Shakespeare. Without these texts that came before, we may not have the amazing play that we have today. It’s important to acknowledge and pay homage to these texts as we appreciate the surviving masterpiece, which is exactly what we will be doing today.

For this episode, I read The Norse Hamlet translated and composed by Soren Filipski.

 

For the full episode show notes visit: ripegoodscholar.com/episodes/norse-hamlet

 

Teller of Tales by Kevin MacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4467-teller-of-the-tales

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

 

Minstrel Guild by KevinMacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4056-minstrel-guild

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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